Essential Pointers For Selecting Your Teenager’s First Car

Teenager's First CarAdmit it, it's not that easy letting your teenager take your car out for a spin or even letting them have the family car for the night. Eventually, you would have to buy them (or help them buy) a car for their own use. Before that day arrives, here are a few considerations for selecting the right car for them.

Reliability

Durability, stability, brand and history are some of the things you need to know about a basic car. Check if the car you're buying can be as reliable as your own vehicle. Remember, your teenage son or daughter may not be as patient on the road or as car-savvy as you are. Research about highly-recommended or highly-discouraged makes and models, to be sure.

Safety

You should prioritise this, since it's your child who will be driving this car. If you are buying used, check for the available safety features and see if they cover the basic needs, such as airbags and anti-lock brakes. If you want to go the extra mile, check for crash test results online, and see which cars and models do better during an accident.

Affordability

The question of whether to buy used or brand new is a major concern when considering cost. Do realise that there are newer models these days that have affordable payment plans. These models may even have teen-friendly safety features not available in a used model.

However, if you are truly set on getting a used car for your teenager, or even passing on your old car to them, be willing to shell out additional funds for engine overhaul, car respray and other upgrades. Clearrenew.com.au says an old vehicle can look new and even have the same protection as a new vehicle if you use quality coating. 

Passing driving school doesn't mean your child should automatically get a car. Talk to them about splitting the insurance payments, gas and maintenance for their vehicle. Allot a fixed time and day for car washing and check-ups. No matter how reliable, safe and durable your car can be, if your teen isn't up to the challenge of car ownership, then let them co-drive the family car until they are ready.